Today marks the 75th anniversary of the NHS, known worldwide as one of the first and best healthcare systems to be universally available and free at the point of delivery.

Unfortunately, while its principles are unshaken, the NHS today is under pressure due to several issues – staff shortages, backlogs from Covid and industrial action to name a few.

Is there anything the construction sector can do to help? The answer actually is ‘yes’. Construction is high-risk industry for both injuries and health issues, but focusing on preventative measures can reduce those risks (consequently reducing some of the pressure on the NHS). Read on to find out more.

Statistics from the Health and Safety Executive show that there has been an average of 61,000 non-fatal injuries in construction each year and that during the period 2020-21 there were 39 fatal injuries. Although that might not seem a large number, it’s 4 times the rate for all industries!

Whilst falls from height and slips, trips and falls feature among the most common causes of injury, every year thousands of people are injured due to hazards arising from the equipment they’re using on site. Take a look at this week’s blog for six common dangers to watch out for.

While the generally drier weather of summer makes it one of the best times for completing construction works, every year the season also brings some additional challenges, for instance around maintaining the quality of products, the reduced availability of workers and specific heat-related safety risks. Of course, this year there are additional woes related to the pandemic and Brexit but in this week’s blog, we’re focusing on four areas of concern that sites face during a typical summer and included some guidance about what you can do to avoid or overcome those challenges.