Aerial photo of London showing the river Thames and some key landmarks

The latest study into the world’s costliest places for construction has placed London at the very top of the list.

Looking at 100 of the world’s largest cities across six continents, the latest Arcadis International Construction Costs (ICC) report ranked London first, ahead of Geneva, Oslo, New York City and then Copenhagen. Find out more in this week’s blog.

Image of a hand holding a green piece of fabric shaped like a house in a grass field.

New rules that came into play this week mean that developers in England now have to deliver 10% Biodiversity Net Gain when building new housing, industrial or commercial developments.

This makes England the first country in the world to make Biodiversity Net Gain a legal requirement so take a look at this week’s blog to find out more about what this means and how it will be implemented.

While construction has long been known for its focus on hard work and technical expertise, research suggests that one of the key strengths of our industry comes from it having embraced a broader range of thinking styles and experiences beyond the ‘typical’.

A new study by the Association for Project Management (APM) has revealed that almost half (46%) of construction professionals identify as neurodivergent, compared to a cross-sector average of 31%. Read on to find out more about what this means and the potential benefits this offers for our industry.

Man wearing a hard hat looking at a futuristic scene of a city, overlaid with an image of the planet Earth

As the world grapples with challenges like climate change and economic uncertainty, the construction industry is adapting and innovating at an unprecedented pace, so for this week’s blog, we’re asking what’s in store for 2024?

From technological advancements to an increased focus on the adoption of sustainable materials and practices, here are just three thought-provoking trends to watch in the coming year.

Construction site featuring one person working in wintery conditions

After a few chilly early mornings and, as we’re likely heading into the coldest months of the year, it’s time once again for the construction industry to brace itself against the full impact of winter.

Working outdoors in rain, snow, ice, fog or wind can be harsh, however there are practical solutions which can help ensure such work is carried out productively and that every site worker stays safe and healthy. Take just a few minutes out of your day to read this week’s blog, where we’re sharing three strategies for weatherproofing the construction site.

Image of the earth at night time being held in human hands

At the opening of COP28 this afternoon, the UN Climate Change Executive Secretary, Simon Stiell, gave a powerful speech, urging delegates to accelerate climate action. His stark message was: “If we do not signal the terminal decline of the fossil fuel era as we know it, we welcome our own terminal decline. And we choose to pay with people’s lives”.

With building operations and construction accounting for nearly 40% of global energy-related CO2 emissions, our industry clearly has to be part of that call to action. Read this week’s blog for what one industry expert says are the key points that the sector should be thinking about.

Construction site worker wearing a face mask and making an OK sign with his hands.

The Health and Safety Executive estimates that, in Great Britain, 4000 construction workers die every year from respiratory diseases caused by long-term exposure to dust particles at work. That’s around 100 times more deaths caused by ill health in the sector than fatal accidents!

So, to answer the question posed in the title of this week’s blog, ‘why wear a mask’, the answer is pretty simple – it might just save your life. Read on for more on this important topic.

hands reaching into centre of an image showing items relating to learning

Thousands of brickies and roofers across England, Wales and Scotland are set to benefit from a major new fully-funded training initiative that aims to upskill the workforce and address common defects.

As part of the industry’s ongoing commitment to building quality homes and with CITB funding, the Home Builders Federation’s (HBF) ‘Home Building Skills Partnership’ has begun delivering a series of brickwork masterclasses and will be rolling out brand-new roofing masterclasses soon. Find out more about these free training opportunities in this week’s blog.

According to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), over 1.2 million working days are lost in the UK because of injuries caused during manual handling tasks in the construction industry.

Aside from the economic impact, such injuries can be painful and have long-term, serious consequences – particularly those involving back problems like slipped discs and repetitive strain injuries. At Sheriff Construction, our site workers undertake mandatory training in this area but we thought we’d use this week’s blog as a reminder of why this is such a backbone of safety in construction and pass on a few general ‘DOs’ and ‘DON’Ts’.

A new NVQ for Brickwork Technicians has just been launched by the Association of Brickwork Contractors.

With building safety compliance in mind, the qualification has been designed for the thousands of people who work within the brickwork industry on important tasks that support the bricklaying process (but who are not actually bricklayers). Find out more here.

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